OBSTETRICS & GYNAECOLOGY FORUM is written by specialists in the field. It aims, primarily, to present articles on the practice of Obstetrics and Gynaecology in South Africa and is distributed to G.P’s and to Specialists concerned with the rendering of healthcare to women.

The views expressed in individual articles are the personal views of the Authors and are notnecessarily shared by the Editors, the Advertisers or the Publisher. No articles may bereproduced in any way without the writtenconsent of the Publisher.

VOLUME 29  I ISSUE 1

In sub-Saharan Africa postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) is the leading direct cause of maternal deaths.1 Of all maternal deaths 17% are due to PPH. In the 2014 to 2016 triennium, as reported by the National Committee for Confidential Enquiries into Maternal Deaths (NCCEMD) in South Africa, haemorrhage caused 624 maternal deaths (16.9% of all deaths) and was the second most common direct cause of maternal deaths.

Gerhard B Theron

The development of slow release systems for parenteral delivery of progestins has transformed the range of available long-acting reversible contraceptives. The intrauterine route consists of three types of systems which differ in physical size and deliver different doses of levonorgestrel.

Norman D Goldstuck

Endometrial cancer is the most common gynaecologic malignancy in females in High/Very-High Human Development Index (HDI) Regions and the third most common gynaecologic malignancy in Low/Medium HDI Regions with the incidence increasing over the last couple of years.

Haynes van der Merwe

Breast cancer is the most common cancer worldwide, and the most common cancer to affect South African women. Screening for breast cancer should thus be a priority for all healthcare workers caring for female patients. Knowledge of risk factors for breast cancer, especially the importance of family history, is essential when educating patients and making decisions about a screening protocol.

Chané Paulsen, Stefan Gebhardt

Benign gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD), including molar pregnancies, comprises of a group of conditions arising from abnormal proliferation of the placental trophoblast. The incidence is approximately 1:1000 pregnancies. With more pregnancies being exposed to ultrasound and an awareness of GTD, these conditions are diagnosed earlier.

Elzanne Olivier; Jennifer L Butt

Malaria infection in pregnancy was estimated to be responsible for approximately 15% of maternal deaths and more than 400 000 cases of maternal anaemia worldwide. The prevalence of malaria is higher in pregnant than non pregnant women and is related to the intensity of transmission.

Nicolene du Toit, Wilhelm D Steyn

Zane Wilson Founder SADAG

  • Neil Amoore,
  • Psychologist, Johannesburg
  • Kevin Bolon,
  • Psychologist, Johannesburg
  • Dr Jan Chabalala,
  • Psychiatrist, Johannesburg
  • Dr Lori Eddy,
  • Psychologist, Johannesburg
  • Lee-Ann Hartman,
  • Psychologist, Johannesburg
  • Dr Frans Korb,
  • Psychiatrist/Psychologist, Johannesburg
  • Professor Crick Lund,
  • Psychiatrist, Cape Town
  • Dr Rykie Liebenberg,
  • Psychiatrist, Johannesburg
  • Dr Colinda Linde,
  • Psychologist, Johannesburg
  • Zamo Mbele,
  • Psychologist, Johannesburg
  • Nkini Phasha,
  • SADAG Director, Johannesburg
  • David Rosenstein,
  • Psychologist, Cape Town
  • Professor Dan Stein,
  • Psychiatrist, Cape Town
  • Professor Bernard van Rensburg,
  • Johannesburg
  • Dr Sheldon Zilesnick,
  • Psychiatrist, Johannesburg
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